Review 19: Books Announced
 

NBOL-19 Books Announced


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We welcome review proposals for any books listed below that are not already assigned to a reviewer. For more information, see Guidelines for Reviewers, final paragraph.



BRADLEY, MATTHEW AND JULIET JOHN, EDS.
READING AND THE VICTORIANS (Ashgate: The Nineteenth Century Series, 2015) -

Examining the swift and radical transformation of nineteenth-century reading in all its personal, historical, literary, and material contexts, contributors stress the continuities and conflicts between the Victorian period and our own. Besides the editors, contributors include Simon Eliot, Stephen Colclough, Beth Palmer, Philip Davis, Catherine Delafield, Sheila Cordner, E. Attar, Rosalind Crone, and Clare Ellis.
To be reviewed by Rachel Ablow.





DAVIES, JEREMY
BODILY PAIN IN ROMANTIC LITERATURE (Routledge, 2014) 228 pp. -

While looking back to the role of pain in eighteenth-century medical controversies as well as forward to the birth of surgical anaesthesia in 1846, this book considers the significance of pain for the poetry, philosophy, and medicine of the Romantic period. Drawing on thinkers ranging from Adam Smith to the Marquis de Sade and on recent work in the medical humanities, Davies aims to show how the study of pain may prompt new ways of thinking about politics, ethics, and identity.
To be reviewed by Blakey Vermeule.





FLEGEL, MONICA
PETS AND DOMESTICITY IN VICTORIAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE: ANIMALITY, QUEER RELATIONS, AND THE VICTORIAN FAMILY (Routledge, February 2015) -

Drawing on both animal studies and queer theory, Flegel shows how the domestic pet in Victorian England elucidates normative sexuality and (re)productivity within the familial home, and how it serves to signify the family's ability to support or threaten the health and morality of the nation. In pursuit of this topic, Flegel probes texts by authors ranging from Clara Balfour and Bessie Rayner Parkes to Anne Brontë, George Eliot, and Charles Dickens.
To be reviewed by Teresa Mangum.





GILMARTIN, KEVIN
WILLIAM HAZLITT: POLITICAL ESSAYIST (Oxford, 2015) 368 pp. -

Against the view that partisan passion undermined his aesthetic judgment, Gilmartin argues that Hazlitt constructively witnessed the early nineteenth-century popular reform movement, reflecting critically on radical politics and expressing his own doubts about social progress. Attacking "Legitimacy" as a revived form of divine right monarchy, he practiced oppositional political expression, and he mobilized radical memory as a way of contending with present injustice and envisioning a political future.
To be reviewed by Jon Klancher.





HARRINGTON, EMILY
SECOND PERSON SINGULAR: LATE VICTORIAN WOMEN POETS AND THE BONDS OF VERSE (Virginia, 2014) 248 pp. -

Emily Harrington offers a new history of women's poetry at the turn of the century that breaks from conventional ideas of nineteenth-century lyric, which focus on individual subjectivity. She argues that women poets conceived of lyric as an intersubjective genre, one that seeks to establish relations between subjects rather than to constitute a subject in isolation.
To be reviewed by Jill Ehnenn.





ISELI, MARKUS
THOMAS DE QUINCEY AND THE COGNITIVE UNCONSCIOUS (Palgrave, 2015) 264 pp. -

Examining De Quincey's notion of the unconscious in light of both modern cognitive science and nineteenth-century science, this book contraposes the rationality of the cognitive unconscious-- as DeQuincey conceived it--to the instinctive and intellectually primitive unconscious of Freudian psychoanalysis. With its cognitive historicist methodology this book also shows that De Quincey participated in nineteenth-century discourse about the mind/body relationship and about the embodied, rational unconscious.
To be reviewed by Robert Maniquis.





MACDONALD, TARA
THE NEW MAN, MASCULINITY AND MARRIAGE IN THE VICTORIAN NOVEL (Pickering & Chatto, February 2015) c. 256 pp. -

Though the term 'New Man' was not coined until 1894, this study locates earlier examples in the novels of Charles Dickens, Anne Brontë , George Eliot and George Gissing. MacDonald shows how Victorian writers used this figure to reassess masculine behaviour and re-imagine the marriage-plot in light of wider social changes.
reviewed by Jacob Jewusiak.





MCKEE, PATRICIA
READING CONSTELLATIONS: URBAN MODERNITY IN VICTORIAN FICTION (Oxford, 2014) -

Applying Benjamin's critique of urban modernity to Dickens's Great Expectations, Hardy's Jude the Obscure, and James's "In the Cage," McKee shows how their characters struggle to adapt themselves to the conventional image of middle-class Victorian success in the rapidly expanding world of metropolitan London. In each chapter McKee deploys the dialectical notion of the "constellation" to read moments in which past and present collide as well as to show how these writers "open out" the city--as the exemplar of modernity--to new modes of articulation. Ultimately, McKee argues, Victorian fiction imagines an urban modernity that compensates for capitalist development by reassembling parts of experience that capitalism typically disintegrates.
To be reviewed by Danielle Gilman.





PETERSON, LINDA, ED.
THE CAMBRIDGE COMPANION TO VICTORIAN WOMEN'S WRITING (Cambridge, 2015) xxi + 294 pp. -

While exemplifying modern feminist criticism, this collection of essays treats the writing of Victorian women in light of book history as well as scholarship on authorship, readership, publishing, periodicals, performance, and postcolonialism. The writing considered here includes poetry, drama, life writing, reviewing, history, travel writing, and children's literature. Besides the editor, contributors include Alexis Easley, Joanne Shattuck, Beth Palmer, Alison Chapman, Linda Hughes, Ella Dzelzainis, Deirdre D’Albertis, Lyn Pykett, Katherine Newey, Carol Hanbery Mackay, Tamara S. Wagner, Mary Ellis Gibson, Jason Rudy, Deborah Logan, Margaret Beetham, Joanne Wilkes, and Claudia Nelson.
To be reviewed by Kim Stern.





PISANI, MICHAEL
MUSIC FOR THE MELODRAMATIC THEATRE IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY LONDON AND NEW YORK (Iowa, 2014) -

Examining productions of melodramas ranging from Frankenstein to Lady Audley's Secret as well as of historical romances by Shakespeare and Schiller, this book shows that music played by instrumental ensembles not only enlivened performances but also served several other ends, such as helping actors sustain the emotional pitch of a monologue or dialogue sequence. It also shows that in a century of seismic social and economic changes, music could provide a moral compass.
To be reviewed by Bridget McFarland.





RINTOUL, SUZANNE
INTIMATE VIOLENCE AND VICTORIAN PRINT CULTURE:REPRESENTATIONAL TENSIONS (Palgrave, 2015) 200 pp. -

Exploring representations of brutality toward women within and outside of marriage, Rintoul shows how intimate violence became both spectacular and unspeakable in the Victorian period, and how the discernible tension between exposure and concealment across multiple texts signals more than confusion about the "correct" way to deal with the problem of abuse.
To be reviewed by Joanna Bourke.





ROBERTS, PETER, ED.
SHIFTING FOCUS: STRANGERS AND STRANGENESS IN LITERATURE AND EDUCATION (Routledge, 2015) 136 pp. -

Examining fiction and drama by writers ranging from Shelley, Charlotte Brontë, and Dickens to Kafka, Beckett, and Camus, contributors explore the educational value of encountering, experiencing, and reflecting both strangers and strangeness. Besides the editor, contributors include Claudia Rozas Gómez, Richard Smith, Nesta Devine, Elias Schwieler, John Freeman-Moir, Ruyu Hung, Alan Scott, and Aidan Curzon-Hobson.
To be reviewed by Thomas Cole.





ROSSINGTON, MICHAEL, JACK DONOVAN AND KELVIN EVEREST, EDS.
THE POEMS OF SHELLEY: VOLUME FOUR 1820-1821 THE POEMS OF SHELLEY: VOLUME FOUR 1820-1821 -

Taking its place with the other four volumes in this series, which present the poems in chronological order of composition, this one includes Epipsychidion and Adonais. Besides freshly examining all manuscript and printed sources for each poem, headnotes and footnotes furnish the personal, literary, historical and scientific information necessary to an informed reading of Shelley's varied and allusive verse.
To be reviewed by Nancy Goslee.





SHAW, W. DAVID
THE GHOST BEHIND THE MASKS: THE VICTORIAN POETS AND SHAKESPEARE (Virginia, 2014) 296 pp. -

Tracing Shakespeare's influence on nine Victorian poets, Shaw argues that they are most Shakespearean not in using any particular trope or figure of speech but in the classical restraint of their great monologues and their sudden descent from grandeur to simplicity. He explores such topics as man-made law versus natural right, Stoic fatalism versus self-reliance, and the sanity of lunatics, lovers, and poets versus the madness of commonplace minds.
To be reviewed by Robert Sawyer.





SMITH, MARTHA NELL
EMILY DICKINSON: A USERS GUIDE (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012) 192 pp. -

Reading Dickinson through the lenses ground by her readers' sense of her life and work, this book draws on prominent critical views from the past century, including sentimental, modernist, new critical, psychological, feminist and postmodernist approaches. The book includes an interactive appendix focused on the Dickinson Electronic Archives, a major online resource the author has been developing for the past ten years.
To be reviewed by Wendy Martin.





SODERMAN, MELISSA
SENTIMENTAL MEMORIALS: WOMEN AND THE NOVEL IN LITERARY HISTORY (Stanford, 2014) -

Synthesizing the history of the novel, women's literary history, and book history, Sodeman revisits the critical frameworks through which we have understood the history of literature. Novels by Sophia Lee, Ann Radcliffe, Charlotte Smith, and Mary Robinson, she argues, offer ways of rethinking some of the key literary concepts of the later eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, from genius and originality to the rise of an English canon.
To be reviewed by Julie Shaffer.





TALLY, ROBERT Y., JR.
POE AND THE SUBVERSION OF AMERICAN LITERATURE: SATIRE, FANTASY, CRITIQUE (Bloomsbury, 2014) -

Using satire and fantasy, Tally argues, to poke fun at an emergent nationalist discourse circulating in the United States, Poe's work undermines the earnest attempts to establish a distinctively national literature in the nineteenth century and also subtly subverts the tenets of an institutionalized American Studies in the twentieth century. Through his satirical critique of national culture and his otherworldly projection of a postnational space of the imagination, Poe establishes a subterranean, nomadic, and altogether worldly literary practice.






TAMBLING, JEREMY
DICKENS' NOVELS AS POETRY: ALLEGORY AND LITERATURE OF THE CITY (Routledge , November 24, 2015) 238 pp. -

Working from Dickens's earliest writings to the latest, combining theory with close analysis of texts, Tambling argues that Dickens constructs an urban poetry linked to the dream-life of characters who both can and cannot awake to fuller, different consciousness. Drawing on Walter Benjamin, Lacan, and Derrida, Tambling shows how Dickens writes a new and comic poetry of the city as well as a secret, unconscious autobiography.
To be reviewed by Elana Gomel.





TEMPLIN, MARY
PANIC FICTION: WOMAN AND ANTEBELLUM ECONOMIC CRISIS (Alabama, 2014) 256 pp. -

Applying the methods of New Historicism and cultural studies to the work of authors such as Catharine Sedgewick and Maria Cummins, Templin shows how their domestic fiction reflects the panics of 1837 and 1857, women's relationships to the marketplace, and the connections between domestic ideology and middle-class formation.
To be reviewed by Tara McGann.





TETRAULT, RONALD
BRITISH BOOKS IN FRANCE BEFORE AND AFTER THE REVOLUTION: IMAGINING NATIONS (Pickering & Chatto, July 2015) c. 256 pp. -

Arguing that British books in France before and after the Revolution directly affected the shaping of French national identity, Tetrault surveys authors, translators, publishers, reviewers, censors and readers, elite readers, mass audiences, and works performed in boulevard theatres.






WILLIAMS, WENDY
GEORGE ELIOT, POETESS (Ashgate, 2014) -

Even more than her fiction, Williams argues, Eliot's poetry shows how she came to believe that orthodox religious views should be replaced by the traditionally female virtues of compassion and fellow-feeling. Eliot's poetry thus reveals her as not only an intellectual and social commentator but also a woman yearning to nurture, participate in, and foster human relationships.
To be reviewed by Christine Chaney.



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